Summary   Summary
Featured Diseases & Conditions
Health Awareness Articles
Articles
Symptom Checker

Symptom Checker
Just click on a body part, choose your symptom and search through a world of health information.

 

Search Diseases

Search Disease

Laceration Repair


Overview :

Laceration repair mends a tear in the skin or other tissue. The procedure is similar to repairing a tear in clothing. Primary care physicians, emergency room physicians, and surgeons usually repair lacerations. The four goals of laceration repair are to stop bleeding, prevent infection, preserve function, and restore appearance. Insurance companies do pay for the procedure. Cost depends upon the severity and size of the laceration.

Before repairing the laceration, the physician thoroughly examines the wound and the underlying tendons or nerves. If nerves or tendons have been injured, a surgeon may be needed to complete the repair. The laceration is cleaned by removing any foreign material or debris. Removing foreign objects from penetrating wounds can sometimes cause bleeding, so this type of wound must be cleaned very carefully. The wound is then irrigated with saline solution and a disinfectant. The disinfecting agent may be mild soap or a commercial preparation. An antibacterial agent may be applied.

Once the wound has been cleansed, the physician anesthetizes the area of the repair by injecting a local anesthetic. The physician may trim edges that are jagged or extremely uneven. Tissue that is too damaged to heal must be removed (debridement) to prevent infection. If the laceration is deep, several absorbable stitches (sutures) are placed in the tissue under the skin to help bring the tissue layers together. Suturing also helps eliminate any pockets where tissue fluid or blood can accumulate. The skin wound is closed with sutures. Suture material used on the surface of a wound is usually non-absorbable and will have to be removed later. A light dressing or an adhesive bandage is applied for 24-48 hours. In areas where a dressing is not feasible, an antibiotic ointment can be applied. If the laceration is the result of a human or animal bite, if it is very dirty, or if the patient has a medical condition that alters wound healing, oral antibiotics may be prescribed.




 Image Gallary
 
Search for information related to Health and wellness
Health Centers
Cardiology and HeartMen's HealthWomen's HealthMother + ChildDiabetesStressInfectious DiseaseSkinEyeCancerStop SmokingWeight ManagementSexual HealthBlood Pressure ManagementAsthmaPregnancy and Child BirthAllergyHair LossDengueCold and FluSore ThroatADHDDental & Oral HealthHigh CholesterolDepressionPolioBreast CancerFood PoisonSnoringConjunctivitisCervical CancerJaundiceGeneral HealthMigraine / HeadacheThyroidBlood SugarProstate CancerKidney DiseaseAnxietyArthritisAutismBipolar DisorderCOPDCaregivingCrohn's DiseaseEpilepsyErectile DysfunctionHealthy AgingIncontinenceMeningitisMenopauseMultiple SclerosisOsteoporosisPain ManagementParkinson's DiseaseRelationshipsSleep ManagementStomach & DigestiveOsteoarthritisPertussisOveractive BladderRheumatoid ArthritisTonsils
Search for information related to Health and wellness
 
Health Pages
blood pressure cancer cholesterol test diabetes diets erectile dysfunction hair loss health health articles healthy living heart diseases high cholesterol pregnancy reduce weight vagina weight wellness health plan sexual problems lower cholesterol heart attack women health asthma weight loss anxiety back problems disease symptoms immunization for children indian home remedies indian recipes Manage weight pathology tests stress how to lower your triglycerides dental plus wt loss diet national diabetes association foods to avoid with diabetes swie flu heart it races tips to get fair complexion high cholesterol bad do i have the flu breast cancer information diets that lose weight fast health green tea abortion facts lowering cholesterol through diet